What is Dysport?

Dysport is an injection containing abobotulinumtoxinA (Botulinum toxin type A). AbobotulinumtoxinA is made from the bacteria that causes botulism. Botulinum toxin blocks nerve activity in the muscles, causing a temporary reduction in muscle activity.

Dysport is used to treat cervical dystonia (severe spasms in the neck muscles).

Dysport is also used to temporarily lessen the appearance of facial wrinkles.

How does Dysport work?

Dysport Injection

Dysport Injection

Whenever your face makes a movement—you smile, squint or frown for instance—your facial muscles contract and the skin over those muscles creases. These are called dynamic wrinkles because they disappear when the facial movements stop. As you age and your skin loses its elasticity, those creases deepen into static, or permanent, lines and wrinkles. Dysport is injected directly into the muscles that cause facial wrinkles, temporarily immobilizing them. It specifically targets the glabullar muscles – the ones that form creases on your forehead when you frown.

Dysport diffuses a bit farther from the injection point than Botox: one to three centimeters compared to Botox’s one centimeter. This means that fewer injections are needed, but it also means that the health professional doing the injections must be very skilled to ensure that the drug does not spread to nearby muscles and cause eyelid and or eyebrow drooping or other unwanted side effects.

How long do results last?

Results begin to appear within one to seven days after treatment, with day three being the median. (In other words, half the patients treated see wrinkle-smoothing results before day three, and half see results afterward.) Dysport contains less protein than Botox, so the body tends to break it down more slowly. The studies are mixed, however, about whether the results lasts longer than Botox. A large clinical trial sponsored by Dysport’s manufacturer and published in the March/April 2009 issue of Archives of Facial Plastic Surgery reported that effects lasted more than 13 months in some people. Botox results can last up to four months.

Important information

The botulinum toxin contained in Dysport can spread to other body areas beyond where it was injected. This has caused serious life-threatening side effects in some people receiving Dysport, even for cosmetic purposes.

You should not receive Dysport if you are allergic to botulinum toxin or cow’s milk, or if you have an infection, swelling, or muscle weakness in the area where the medicine will be injected.

Call your doctor at once if you have a hoarse voice, drooping eyelids, vision problems, severe muscle weakness, loss of bladder control, or trouble breathing, talking, or swallowing. Some of these effects can occur up to several weeks after receiving a Dysport injection. This injection should be given only by a trained medical professional, even when used for cosmetic purposes. Botox is another brand of botulinum toxin injection. Do not seek botulinum toxin injections from more than one medical professional at a time. If you switch healthcare providers, be sure to tell your new provider how long it has been since your last botulinum toxin injection.

Before receiving Dysport injection, tell your doctor if you have ALS (Lou Gehrig’s disease), myasthenia gravis, Lambert-Eaton syndrome, a breathing disorder, trouble swallowing, facial muscle weakness, a change in the appearance of your face, seizures, bleeding problems, heart disease, diabetes, if you have had or will have surgery, or if you have ever received other botulinum toxin injections such as Botox or Myobloc.

The effects of Dysport injection are temporary. Your symptoms may return completely within 3 months after an injection. After repeat injections, it may take less and less time before your symptoms return, especially if your body develops antibodies to the botulinum toxin.

Before taking this medicine

You should not receive Dysport injecton if you are allergic to botulinum toxin or cow’s milk, or if you have an infection, swelling, or muscle weakness in the area where the medicine will be injected. Tell your doctor if you have ever had a side effect after receiving a botulinum toxin in the past

To make sure Dysport is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have:

  • amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, or “Lou Gehrig’s disease”);
  • myasthenia gravis;
  • Lambert-Eaton syndrome;
  • a breathing disorder such as asthma or emphysema;
  • problems with swallowing;
  • facial muscle weakness (droopy eyelids, weak forehead, trouble raising your eyebrows);
  • a change in the normal appearance of your face;
  • a seizure disorder;
  • bleeding problems;
  • heart disease;
  • diabetes;
  • if you have had or plan to have surgery (especially on your face); or
  • if you have ever received other botulinum toxin injections such as Botox or Myobloc (especially in the last 4 months).

AbobotulinumtoxinA is made from human plasma (part of the blood) which may contain viruses and other infectious agents. Donated plasma is tested and treated to reduce the risk of it containing infectious agents, but there is still a small possibility it could transmit disease. Talk with your doctor about the risks and benefits of using this medication.

It is not known whether Dysport will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant.

It is not known whether abobotulinumtoxinA passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Tell your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby while receiving Dysport.